Spicy Black Bean, Hominy and Kale Stew

by Anjali @ The Picky Eater on March 6, 2013

IMG_7083

My first experience with hominy was about 5 years ago, when I ate the most delicious vegetarian posole at one of my favorite cafes. I had no idea that hominy was made from corn (maize to be exact), or how it was made.

For those of you who aren’t familiar with hominy, it’s made when maize kernels are soaked in a solution of either lime or lye. This removes the hull and germ of the corn, causes the grain to puff up to about twice its normal size, and gives it a chewy texture.

Hominy has a unique, mild flavor, and is perfect in southwestern dishes – especially soups and stews! So I was super excited when I found this recipe on CookingLight.com for a Black Bean and Hominy Stew, which gave me the perfect opportunity to use hominy in a recipe for the first time at home.

IMG_7084

The husband loved the spicy flavor of the soup and the great texture it had as well!

We ate it with some baked tortilla chips for some added crunch. I was able to make this recipe in about 40 minutes on a weeknight – after I had come home from work! I loved how quick and easy it was to make.

One note for this recipe: I had to use ready-to-eat hominy (which comes in a can), but I honestly prefer the texture and flavor from cooking dried hominy. The drawback for that is it’s a full day effort – you have to soak the hominy overnight, and let it cook for at least a couple hours on low heat to get it ready to go. I didn’t have that kind of time this week, so canned hominy it was! I just found a can that only had hominy, salt and water – so I felt ok about using it, especially since I rinsed the hominy after I got it out of the can.

IMG_7065

Any way you make it, I promise it will be a crowd-pleaser at home. You can also add fun toppings to it like grated cheese, low fat sour cream or low fat Greek Yogurt, avocado, crushed tortilla chips, diced tomatoes – the list goes on and on!

The Ingredients

Recipe from CookingLight.com, minor modifications in this recipe below

  • 2 poblano chiles
  • 8 ounces tomatillos, husks removed and halved ( about 4)
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 1/2 cups chopped onion
  • 1 jalapeño, seeded and minced
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 3 cups organic vegetable broth
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground red pepper
  • 2 ( 15.5 ounce) cans unsalted black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 ( 8 ounce) bunch kale, tough stems removed, leaves chopped ( about 4 packed cups)
  • 1 ( 15 ounce) can hominy, rinsed and drained. Note: Use canned hominy if you are short on time. If you have time, then for a better flavor & texture use dried hominy. Soak it in cold water overnight (for at least 8 hours), and then simmer it for 1-2 hours until it is cooked.
  • 6 tablespoons reduced-fat sour cream or 2% Greek yogurt
  • 2 ounces shredded sharp white cheddar cheese ( about 1/2 cup)
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro

The Directions

Step 1 (Option 1 for cooking the poblano peppers):  – Preheat broiler to high.Place poblano chiles on a foil-lined baking sheet. Broil 7 minutes on each side or until blackened and charred. Place in a paper bag; fold to close tightly. Let stand 15 minutes. Peel chiles; cut in half lengthwise. Discard seeds and membranes; coarsely chop. Set aside.

Step 1 (Option 2): Alternatively, you can just dice the poblano chiles and throw them into the pot with the onions & jalapeño if you don’t feel like roasting them! I chose this option because it was faster. The poblano chiles still had great flavor to them.

Step 2: Heat a Dutch oven over medium heat. Add oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add onion and jalapeño; sauté 5 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally.

IMG_7066

Step 3: Meanwhile, place the tomatillos in a food processor, and process until smooth. Set aside.

.
IMG_7067
Step 4: Add garlic and cumin; sauté 1 minute, stirring constantly. Add tomatillos, broth, and next 4 ingredients (through kale); bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer for 10 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Add roasted poblanos and hominy; cook for 2 minutes or until heated through.
.
IMG_7070
Step 5: Ladle into each of 4 shallow bowls; top evenly with sour cream/Greek yogurt and/or cheese. Sprinkle with cilantro.
.
IMG_7077
This stew had such deep flavor, it tasted like it had been cooking on the stovetop for hours. We both went back for seconds, and then used the leftovers a couple days later as a topping for nachos (without the stew liquid).
.
The husband said this recipe reminded him of a Mexican take on my White Bean and Kale Soup – which totally made sense to me. What a difference a change in spices can make!
.
I wouldn’t be surprised if this recipe made an appearance on our dinner table again very soon 🙂
.
IMG_7073

Spicy Black Bean, Hominy and Kale Stew

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 40 minutes

Yield: 6 servings

Serving Size: 1.25 cups of Stew

Calories per serving: 240

Fat per serving: 7.7g

Nutritional Info Per Serving: 240 Calories, 7.7g Fat, 10.9g Protein, 33.3g Carbs, 8g Fiber

Ingredients

  • 2 poblano chiles
  • 8 ounces tomatillos, husks removed and halved (about 4)
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 1/2 cups chopped onion
  • 1 jalapeño, seeded and minced
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 3 cups organic vegetable broth
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground red pepper
  • 2 (15.5-ounce) cans unsalted black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 (8-ounce) bunch kale, tough stems removed, leaves chopped (about 4 packed cups)
  • 1 (15-ounce) can hominy, rinsed and drained
  • 6 tablespoons reduced-fat sour cream or 2% Greek yogurt
  • 2 ounces shredded sharp white cheddar cheese (about 1/2 cup)
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Directions

  1. Preheat broiler to high.
  2. Place poblano chiles on a foil-lined baking sheet. Broil 7 minutes on each side or until blackened and charred. Place in a paper bag; fold to close tightly. Let stand 15 minutes. Peel chiles; cut in half lengthwise. Discard seeds and membranes; coarsely chop. Set aside. [Alternatively, you can just dice the poblano chiles and throw them into the pot with the onions & jalapeño if you don't feel like roasting them!]
  3. Heat a Dutch oven over medium heat. Add oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add onion and jalapeño; sauté 5 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally.
  4. Meanwhile, place the tomatillos in a food processor, and process until smooth. Set aside.
  5. Add garlic and cumin; sauté 1 minute, stirring constantly. Add tomatillos, broth, and next 4 ingredients (through kale); bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer for 10 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Add roasted poblanos and hominy; cook for 2 minutes or until heated through.
  6. Ladle into each of 4 shallow bowls; top evenly with sour cream/Greek yogurt and/or cheese. Sprinkle with cilantro.
http://pickyeaterblog.com/black-bean-hominy-and-kale-stew/

{ 20 comments… read them below or add one }

Sarah @ Making Thyme for Health March 7, 2013 at 8:32 am

I’m so glad you explained what hominy is because I had no idea! This sounds amazing. I have an addiction to kale…please, don’t tell anyone! 🙂

Reply

Anjali @ The Picky Eater March 9, 2013 at 12:21 am

No problem at all 🙂 My husband didn’t know what hominy was either (and if it wasn’t for that one dish I had a few years back, I wouldn’t have!) You and I sound very similar – I LOVE kale – I don’t know what I would do if I didn’t have it at least once a week!

Reply

dixya @ food, pleasure, and health March 7, 2013 at 9:10 am

i have seen hominy at stores in a can but never bothered to look at this. Will have to look into it soon 🙂 thanks for the cooking time warning with dry ones!

Reply

Anjali @ The Picky Eater March 9, 2013 at 12:22 am

Thanks Dixya! You’ll have to let me know how you like this recipe! And yes, the dried hominy definitely takes way longer to cook, but if you have the time and if it’s your first time cooking hominy – I’d definitely recommend it!

Reply

Maria Tadic March 7, 2013 at 5:25 pm

This looks so yummy! I have a big can of hominy and have been trying to figure out what to do with it! This looks like a great recipe, especially for these last few cold winter days!

Reply

Anjali @ The Picky Eater March 9, 2013 at 12:23 am

Hehe yay! Thanks so much Maria – I’m sure you will love this recipe!!

Reply

Courtney March 8, 2013 at 8:09 am

This looks delicious – thanks for sharing 🙂

Reply

Anjali @ The Picky Eater March 9, 2013 at 12:24 am

Thanks Courtney!! You’ll have to let me know if you end up trying it and how it turns out for you! 🙂

Reply

Brandy March 11, 2013 at 8:51 am

First time visitor to your site, I am also on a mission to eat healthier! I am excited to try this, sounds delicious and I have been looking for a way to use kale for the first time.
The only issue I see with me using your recipes is that they look mostly vegetarian?
I have a boyfriend that I cook for who is a serious protein eater. He works out a lot and needs the protein to help build muscle. He will eat healthy foods but I can’t get him away from the meat and not sure if I even want to.
I wonder if I could add some ground beef to this….

Reply

Anjali @ The Picky Eater March 13, 2013 at 4:37 pm

Hi Brandy!! It’s so nice to meet you! 🙂 So yes – you are right that my recipes are mostly vegetarian, but you can totally add meat to almost any of them! Like for this recipe you could add chicken or turkey or beef – pretty much any meat would work. And for most of my other recipes you can sub out the veggie protein (tofu, beans, etc) and add in meat instead! Hope that helps, can’t wait to hear how you like my other recipes!!

Reply

Brandy March 12, 2013 at 10:12 am

WELL, I MADE THIS LAST NIGHT.
I did everything just the same except I browned some stew meat with the onions and jalapenos, everything else was the same. I also didn’t read close enough and added the hominey with the other vegetables instead of waiting to do it at the end, was still very delicious! Super flavorful and healthy. My boyfriend LOVED it too.
I am so grateful to know how to roast pablanos now, I feel like I am going to be adding these suckers to a lot of the food I cook, they are so tasty. I look forward to using tomatillos again too!
My next plan is for a roasted vegetable salsa, using pablanos of course!!!
Thanks for the recipe!

Reply

Anjali @ The Picky Eater March 13, 2013 at 4:38 pm

Omg yay!!! Thank you so much for the update and I’m so glad you liked this recipe!! Great idea with browning the meat with the onions and jalapeños – I’m sure that gave it some great flavor since it allowed it to cook with all the spices/etc. as well. Roasted vegetable salsa with poblanos would be divine too 🙂

Reply

May March 13, 2013 at 9:14 am

I love black beans and I love beans in soup even more! This is a great recipe for a first-timer like me to find on your website. Do you can your own black beans? I haven’t quite figured that one out yet. Please let me know if you have a recipe. That would be awesome! Thank you!

Reply

Anjali @ The Picky Eater March 13, 2013 at 4:40 pm

Hi May!! It’s so great to meet you here! I love beans a ton too – I like putting them in everything 🙂 To your question – no I have actually never canned my own black beans. I either use pre-canned and wash them, or I use dried beans – soak them overnight and then cook them on the stovetop. If you figure out how to can them yourself let me know!!

Reply

India April 24, 2013 at 3:45 am

OMG this seems so yummy!!! I can’t wait to try it!

Reply

Anjali @ The Picky Eater April 24, 2013 at 8:15 am

Thank you! I’m sure you will love it!

Reply

Annette May 13, 2013 at 4:49 pm

I made this and my family loved it. I used chicken broth instead of vegetable broth but left everything else the same. Will make this again!

Reply

Anjali @ The Picky Eater May 13, 2013 at 10:11 pm

Oh awesome!! I’m so happy to hear that Annette! 🙂

Reply

Sarah November 16, 2013 at 8:11 am

What if I can’t find tomatillos?

Reply

Anjali @ The Picky Eater November 17, 2013 at 9:22 pm

If you can’t find whole/fresh tomatillos — see if you can find tomatillo salsa! Most stores will have it year-round (it’s also called “Salsa Verde”) – and that should be a decent substitute. Hope that helps!

Reply

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: